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Level 2 Movement Analysis & Sample Teaching Assignments

Level 2 Movement Analysis:

At Level 2 a candidate should be able to distinguish “what is happening” and make a lesson content decision based on that observation as well as the student’s goals.

What does this mean in plain English? A Level 2 candidate should be able to identify more than just the components of good skiing. The candidate should be able to identify both the Effective and Ineffective skiing visual cues and have a greater understanding of what those cues allow the skier to do or keep the skier from being able to accomplish. Movement Analysis at Level 2 begins to be an ongoing process with the candidate monitoring what the student is doing and providing feedback within a coaching scenario.

Level 2 Sample Teaching Assignments:

One of the keys to a successful teaching performance in an exam environment is to remember this simple directive: knowing that you want to affect a change in the performance of the skis will help you figure out the steps needed to get to your goal. As you review these sample teaching assignments, note that in every case, you can imagine what the skis are doing when the lesson begins. Can you picture what you would like the skis to be doing when the lesson ends? Work towards that goal!

A wedge skier has an easy time turning left, but difficulty turning right because the right ski is “railed” (tipped) on edge in BOTH directions. Help this skier develop the edge releasing and rotational movements of the feet separate from the upper body so the skier may steer turns smoothly in both directions.

A wedge skier accelerates from turn to turn, gets scared, throws the skis sideways and skids to a stop. Help this skier develop the rotational skills of the legs and feet separate from the upper body necessary to control their speed throughout the entire run and ski more safely.

A skier making wedge christie turns starts each turn with a twist of the shoulders. Help this skier develop the rotational skills of the legs and feet
separate from the upper body so the turns that flow together.

A skier making wedge christie turns wants to look cool like his friends. Help this skier develop the edge releasing and rotational skills necessary to initiate a turn with parallel skis so the skier can look cool like his buddies.

An open parallel skier skis turns with an elongated traverse in between turns. Help this skier control the relationship of the COM to the Base of Support to direct pressure along the length of the skis so that the skier can make turns without a long traverse in between.

An open parallel skier is faced with icy conditions, but wants to ski today. Help this skier develop the pressure control skills necessary to increase and decrease edge angles using inclination and angulation so that the skier may ski the icy terrain.

An open parallel skier wants to ski faster but is afraid of just going straight down the hill. Help this skier develop the ability to control edge angles through the use of inclination and angulation so the skier can learn to carve a turn.

An advanced parallel skier wants to ski bumps with friends, but has never tried. Help this skier develop the pressure control skills to regulate the
magnitude of pressure created through ski/snow interaction so she can slither smoothly through the bumps with her friends.

An advanced parallel skier makes turns in which the inside (uphill) ski is on a different path than the outside (downhill) ski in the finish phase of the turn. The tips of the skis get farther apart at the finish of each turn and the outside ski is not as bent as the inside ski at the finish of the turn. Help this skier develop the skills to control pressure from ski to ski and direct pressure to the outside ski, so that the skis stay parallel and the outside ski has more grip in the finish of the turn.

An advanced parallel skier has divergent tips at the initiation phase of the turn. The tips are farther apart at the initiation of the turn than during shaping and finish. Help this skier develop the pressure control and edge angles needed to keep his/her skis parallel and engaged at the initiation phase of the turn.

Open parallel skier wakes up to 8 inches of new snow. Having never skied snow that deep he is a little weary of the conditions. Help this skier develop the skills necessary to ski in deeper snow.

An open parallel skier makes “Z” turns, with very forceful and sudden initiations, followed by a very short, highly-edged finish, more straight than shaped, picking up speed before the next, equally abrupt initiation. Help this skier make rounder turns, with consistent shape and speed control.

Prepare an intermediate zone parallel skier for her first bump run. She is not aggressive, but wants to try them.

An older (50+) open parallel skier is asking for tactical advice on how to manage steeper slopes before his trips to a western mountain resort. He is afraid of speed and currently has to make “hockey stops” again and again when following his more accomplished friends. Help him meet his goal.